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Search Results 50 to 99 of about 2,025 (some duplicates have been removed)
collection program, end quote. nsa officials said the agency's activities were lawful and any mistakes were largely
for this fiscal year, among top spenders cia, and then nsa.
keith alexander, the head of the nsa, one of the most powerful men in the world, a man who up until now has been content in the shadows, defending himself on video, before a crowd peppered with hecklers. >> our nation takes stopping terrorism as one of the most important things. >> freedom. >> exactly. and with that, when you think about it, how do we do that. because we stand for freedom.
of the nsa gens conducting that so-called investigation or ever punished. that is an illustration of the kind of abuse you can expect in a program that watches everyone all the time like a big brother. it cost a lot of money but few members of congress know how much it costs. as part of the so-called black budget, the budget that is kept secret even from members of congress, it is safe to say that it cost billions of dollars
>> that's right. and sometimes the nsa folks come after the fact to the court and say hey, court, here's what we say happened. here's what we believe happened. just approve it retroactively. so here's what i'm saying. you need to get advanced approval for even a query. certainly you need to get probable cause for any kind of content information.
government? in what way? >> reporter: i hear you clearly. you're saying whatever the n.s.a. is doing is okay with me. >> it's great. it's essential. by the way president obama thinks it's essential. it's essential if we want to minimize the kind of strikes that we just had in boston. it's absolutely essential. >> reporter: at what point would be it be alarming for you in terms of government surveillance?
declassified unprecedented information about the nsa, but we can go further. so the apartment of justice will underublic the rationale article 215 of the patriot act. and release information that entails authority and oversight.
and maybe the nsa was spending money. we know 14.7 billion going to the cia every year.
>> it's incliewr from the document because it's really an n.s.a. internal audit is how many of these were reported to the court. a portion them should have been that have to do with fisa authorities, when you're looking into americans' records and we honestly don't have the rest of the chain ton what was reported. what we coknow is there are thousands of them and the obama administration has assured us and the public before this came out that it happens infrequently, once in a while. >> warner: now, equally
, this is nearly 3,000 violations, over a one-year period. we should point out the nsa says, though, in a statement, quote, we're a human-run agency operating in a complex environment with a number of different regulatory regimes, so at times we find ourselves on the wrong side of the line. but we have been assured, up and down, both on background with officials and on television, that the proper oversight is in
abuse? there are no allegations and i am very confident knowing the nsa and how they operate that purposely somebody's out there trying to abuse this program or listen in on people's e-mail or --
the nsa to send to the for its review the
for it to be within the four squares of the law as the nsa understands it, is that right?
. is the nsa reading our email? >> yes. they are scanning every email as you type it. >> so as you type it they are scanning it? >> as soon as you send it, it goes through a splitter. there's a fiber optic slipper at the folsom street facility here in san francisco. one copy goes to whoever you're sending it to the other copy
sending it to the other copy goes to the nsa. >> reporter: you're kidding. every email sent? >> since about 2002, yes. >> reporter: how do they have possibly the capacity to store all that stuff and even if they get it how do they figure out what to look at? >> they have the most powerful computers in the world. they are building the biggest data center in the world in utah. this thing is going to store something on the order of x exobites. it's an incredible amount of
false testament about the nsa surveillance program during a senate hearing in march. his office had removed a fact sheet after concerns were raised. i appreciate it is difficult talking about programs in public settings. the american people expect and deserve honest answers create it is difficult to get a straight
that was posted, all right? and that talks in general figures, what the cia budget was, what the nsa budget was, and so on. that causes some harm, but not a great deal of harm. you go to the website and start clicking on things and get down to specific operational
the most basic information about what the nsa is doing and spying on american citizens and what the fisa court has been doing in terms of declaring some of this illegal, some of it legal. remember, we keep hearing that there's all kinds of robust oversight by congress and we need not worry and yet these members of congress, one who is
, but we .hould stop reporting this clearly, it's not right. >> your response to the director of the nsa general keith
and a person reads it if it doesn't they are storing it any way for up to five years and the nsa has this interesting term they use the word collect. they don't collect an email
of indicating about shows that under certain conditions starting in 2011 the nsa was given the authority to search for u.s. person identifiers,
behind the nsa surveillance programs. you've read through it. were you comforted by it? do you think it made a clear case for why they have this authority and why it needs to be used? >> no, it reads like someone got high and mixed up a deepak chopra book with their manual. >> so you didn't like it? >> i was not that impressed. >> so you didn't write it?
, 69% goes to the nsa, cia and the national reconnaissance center. how have you assessed from all that you have been reporting here the value we're getting, the bank for the buck? what are we doing well and not so well? >> they have some fairly frank internal report cards here. they talk about where they think they've had successes and where they have critical gaps. of course, the president and
of the intelligence committee. >> exactly, and a very strong ally for the government and n.s.a. in supporting these efforts. she said that she feels the subsector, subsection of violation thereas she doesn't have authority over, she should now perhaps gain authority to review some of those that have to do with foreign
of the documents from nsa. >> the judge said that the n sa has been lying to the only court that meets in secret has been lying to that court for years and years and the court said it needed to stop. this opinion was from 2011 and we just got it two days ago. >> reporter: so this brings up a question to me. i don't know what you guys think, do we have any privacy at all when you go on the internet? >> from our perspective at the electronic frontier foundation
the nsa breaking any law whatsoever but we can do better. i have to educate my caucus more, the democratic caucus and we're trying to declassify as much as we can. we -- >> representative king, i want a very quick response from you, if you will. thank you, representative ruppersberger. >> okay, fine. >> just a quick response. >> over the last several weeks general alexander, all these top people have come in and subjected themselves to questioning from any member of congress at all including those most critical and found those who are most critical publicly
to keep that email private unless the government comes with a warrant. the nsa has not gotten warrants to read your email and yet they
getting it and they've said and other members have said that they are forced to learn about what the nsa is doing from what they're reading in our reporting. >> and when you say they're being blocked, how are they being blocked? people are refusing to give it to them in congress? >> correct. i think the most amazing thing, one of the most amazing things in this whole episode, martha, is that there is a 2011 opinion,
nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing
pressed harder, what he learned is it actually came from an nsa sewer sent, and -- intercept, and he was so outraged, he dropped the case. jenna: interesting. how some of this is being applied legally, what does that mean for our constitutional rights. john, thank you so much for the reporting, and we look forward to having you back.
>> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitras, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for her work, for her films, she found she gets stopped a lot at the airport and not anything like what you might get stopped for at the airport for. she's been stopped dozens and dozens of times at the airport. for interrogations that sometimes last for hours. miss poitras started taking extraordinary precautions with her data using encrypted e-mail, working on computers that were not connected to the internet. stashing her notes in safe deposit boxes. she kept on, though, getting stopped at the airport. starting in 2006, she was detained and questioned like
for the american people. opposition mounts to the nsa's mass collection of the phone records of millions of americans, the guardian reveals the existence of another secret contractxkeyscore, the barely everything the user does on the internet including e- mail, online chats, and browsing history. we will speak to spencer ackerman and longtime innocent expert journalist james bamford. his most recent article is headlined, "they know much more than you think." >> they claim we are only doing international, only doing foreign communications. when you're asking for local phone calls throughout the united states, everybody in the united states on a daily basis, where is the truth in all of these claims? >> all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the sentencing hearing for army whistleblower bradley manning began wednesday with a prosecution witness undermining the state's own claims manning's disclosures to wikileaks harm the united states. on wednesday, retired brigadier general robert carr, who oversaw the pentagon
. >> thank you. >> moving on to the nsa. it has been roughly 2.5 months since the edward snowden leaks were exposed to the world and the mass surveillance operations unveiled. to this day, the nsa still is not sure of the extent of these leaks. unnamed sources within the intelligence committee told nbc news that the nsa is overwhelmed trying to figure out what edward snowden took. keith alexander was asked in july about just how much the agency knows regarding the extent of the leaks. >> let me ask you about edward snowden. you cannot tell us what he got but do you feel now that you know what he got? >> yes. >> this latest report contradicts that claim. alexander answered the question in a more general sense, a spokesman said. more news is breaking about the scope of the nsa's surveillance of the internet, particularly u.s. networks. more unnamed government and in taligent's officials -- intelligence officials said the u.s. has the ability to monitor 75% of the domestic internet traffic here. it does this through a series of relationships with internet providers that at the request of the n
? >>> and nsa surveillance programs after the white house issues secret court rulings and president obama says he's on a personal mission to make colleges more affordable. we'll tell you what he's got planned. >>> welcome to the "journal" editorial report. growing concerns both here and abroad about america's hands-off approach to the middle east. egypt moves closer to civil war. a syndicated columnist and author of 11 books on the middle east joins me now from london. welcome back to the program. great to have you here. >> thank you. . >> good, let's look at syria. first, a year ago, i think it was, president obama famously said their use of chemical weapons would be a red line that syria shouldn't cross and would have consequences. what is bashar assad's consequences that he's willing to cross that line? >> what happened recently was the sixth attack and now a pattern is emerging, each attack has been bigger than the previous one. so he has been testing both the international and public opinion, the united states resolve and also how far he can go inside syria. now we can establish that patt
the u.s. respond? plus, fresh outrage over the nsa's surveillance programs after the white house releases secret court rulings. and president obama says he's on a personal mission to make college more affordable. we will tell you what he has planned. >>> welcome to "the journal editorial report." i'm paul gigot. growing here and abroad about america's hands-off approach to the middle east. as new evidence of chemical weapons used in syria surfaces and egypt moves closer to civil war. we a great to have you here. welcome back to the program. >> thank you for having me. >> good. let's look at syria first. a year ago, i think it was the president famously, president obama, fame famously said -- use of chemical weapons would be a red line that syria shouldn't cross and would have consequences. what is assad's calculation that he would cross, be willing to cross that red line? >> small-scale attacks and nothing happened. what happened recently was the sixth attack and -- each attack has been bigger than the previous one with the exception of one in the middle. so -- he has been testin
to emerge about the n.s.a.'s massive surveillance programs. that government officials assured us they weren't listening to our calls or reading our emails. >> n.s.a. cannot target your emails. >> and have not. >> and have not. >> does the n.s.a. collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans. >> no sir. >> does the n.s.a. intercept americans' cell phone conversations. >> no. >> google searches. >> no. >> text messages. >> no. >> there is no spying on americans, we don't have a domestic spying program. >> are you telling the truth? it depends on your definition, i guess of truth. the narc times reports that the national supreme court administration is in fact searching the contents of vast amounts of americans email and text communications into and out of the country. that sounds like domestic spying to me. press secretary jay carney doubled down on the administration's loose definition of the word lying. >> joe schmo from kokomo wants to know if he sends and email overseas if it's being read, what do you say? >> it's not being read. the information targeted
>> coming up, the u.s. government released documents showing a past secret court ruling on nsa surveillance. they chastise the nsa for illegally collecting tens of thousands of e-mails. the unmasking ahead. the army whistleblower manning sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking documents but the story does not end there. we will look at the extreme conditions placed on the media as we covered the trial. in san francisco, officials are considering a class-action lawsuit against nevada, laming it gave hundreds of psychiatric patients at one-way ticket to california. it is thursday, august 22. 5 p.m. in washington dc. while the obama administration is trying to beat its critics to the punch in the wake of the nsa surveillance scandal, they are coming clean, in a way, anyway. and the ruling that came out in 2011 after the electronic frontier foundation filed a request pretty recently. the court lambasted the nsa for illegally collecting as many as 56,000 e-mails from innocent people each year over three years. then the nsa proceeded to misrepresent the size and scope of that col
it was harsh. how about those people who lied to the congress that represents the people about the nsa activities and bold faced lies saying they did not spy on americans? that is all i have to say. what you think about the sentence to reprimanding and what others would do if they provide that type of information? those in the future might provide this type of information to the public as well? caller: i would like to echo the previous gentleman's comments, and that is they did take an oath. at what point does your --scious do the right thing it is really a tough question. he did break his oath. at the same time, at what point is there a point when you should break the oath when it is for the greater good? >> usa today reflects hemlines and other papers. nsa admits new privacy violations. kevin johnson writing about the top intelligence officials here yen . there are other accounts of the story as well. theheard some thoughts on 35-year sentence handed down. you could make your thoughts known as well. kentucky up next. archie on the independent line. good morning. personally i think th
about the nsa. "the washington post" just reporting the nsa has broken privacy rules or overstepped legal authority thousands of times each year since 2008. according to an internal audit, most of the violations are of americans or foreign intelligence officials in the united states. and the "washington post" also reporting that the chief judge of the secret court that's supposed to provide oversight of the government's spying program says the court's ability to do so is limited. john sununu joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. >> with the news breaking, certainly an expansion of what we have been hearing about the nsa in terms of swpying. your thoughts? >> two things. a lot of what happens in an agency, even the nsa, is a reflection of the culture they see from the top. you have a. president and administration that levels in going beyond the box f you will, that they are limited to by law. i think that seeped all the way down into the nsa. even though the audit says i think it's in the last year they point out there's nearly 3,000 violati violations, it does say that the b
later when the nsa program has expanded so much. sideyou want allies on our , standing firm against islamic terrorism, after the president says the war is almost over -- i support the nsa program. we went through the nuances. apart from the isolationist the blameart from america first crowd in congress, one of the main reasons why we have a hard time maintaining support for programs such as the nsa is because the president has undercut us. he speaks in a schizophrenic way. he should be the one out there on national television. he should be the one of there, instead of talking about phony scandals, he should be talking about the speeches he has made about islamic terrorism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. [applause] we are up against a situation where people considered republicans or conservatives are defending a program of left of center president refuses to defend it himself. the country has to come first. that is why i believe a program such as the nsa, that as the basis for today's program, is so essential. let me talk about privacy versus security. menace of comm
president obama justifies the nsa's collection of metadata, referring to millions of individuals' telephone records and internet, airline and credit card data. experts warn that the invasion of privacy is anything but. many players in government characterize the nsa's use of data as more or less benign. but metadata is more powerful than most realize. it can reveal a person's religious and political views, economic standing, sexual preference, personality, mental health, ethnicity. use of addictive substances and more. the ability to characterize groups by these traits might tempt some in government from finding terrorists to targeting groups because of their political leanings. so say three metadata specialists. they're proposed solution? give the citizenry the power to set controls on corporations and companies who collect their data, whether and with whom it can be shared, and whether or not it should be destroyed permanently. people won't have access to their digital data trails in a way similar to an e-mail in- box, so that people can monitor who views their data and who uses it. quest
" reported nsa is snooping on a broader range of americans who communicate with people overseas. this issthe director of nsa, reveals new steps to prevent another snowden from accessing america's top-secret, fox news chief white house correspondent ed henry with the report. >> reporter: general keith alexander, revealed a new step to crackdown, prevent computer administrator from leaking classified documents, revealing he slashing by 90% the nearly 1,000 systems administrators either employed by his agency or like snowden hired as contractors. >> what we're in the process of doing, not fast enough, reducing system by 9% for first -- 90% to make our networks more secure. >> reporter: nsa official told fox the agency had been planning the cuts before the leaks but is now accelerating them to reduce number of outside people with access to sensitive information. nsa officials saying that move will provide quote, greater grand layerty of data access control, supported with strong crypto graphic enforcement as president obama faces new questions about how extensive nsa surveillance programs are, a
snowden temporary asylum, the nsa surveillance program is coming under increasing criticism in washington from an unlikely bipartisan coalition. we will speak with republican huggers member thomas massie of kentucky and democratic congressman or her john conyers of michigan on their efforts to tracking everyom phone call in the united states. >> it is my fear that we are on the verge of becoming a surveillance state, collecting billions of electronic records on law-abiding americans every single day. >> then, a national strike for a living wage and the right to unionize in the fast food and retail sectors spreads across 7 cities. [indiscernible] we cannot support our families on what we make. workerill speak with one who went on strike. he is a father of three who works at both burger king and pizza hut. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration is reconsidering plans for a summit with russian president vladimir putin next month after russia granted a year of temporary asylum to national se
, the nsa's own internal audit reveals the agency has broken its own privacy rules and overstepped its legal authority thousands of times a year. then we go to cairo where the muslim brotherhood has called for a day of rage after more than 600 people were killed on wednesday. >> the one thing people will not stand for in the long term is to have this kind of regressive security state inflicted upon them. once the targets of this authoritarian apparatus moves away from the islamists and starts imposing itself on other parts of egyptian society, then perhaps,e might see, once again a popular uprising against that kind of crackdown. >> we will speak with sharif abdel kouddous in cairo and p.j. crowley, former state department spokesperson, who is called for the u.s. to suspend military aid to egypt and call the ouster of mohamed morsi a coup. then, didn't eight-year-old spy for america? we look at how u.s. allies in yemen used a child the place electronic chips on the man he considered to be his surrogate father. days later, the man was killed in u.s. drone strike. all of that and more coming u
you next three. >> john: i'm john roberts in for chris wallace. new allegations rock the nsa. documents leaked why former nsa contractor edward snowden detail thousands of privacy violations by the agency after repeated denials from the white house. >> what you are not reading about is the government actually abusing these programs. >> john: we'll discuss with a key member of the homeland security committee and critic of the nsa kentucky senator rand paul. then, another week of chaos in egypt as the interim government's crackdown on supporters of ousted president mohammed morsi leaves hundreds of people dead. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. thee'll discuss the deteriorating situation in the region and the u.s. response with republican congressman pete king of new york and democratic senator richard blumenthal of connecticut. plus, another delay for the president's healthcare law forces the obama administration to play defense. >> this is no longer a political debate. this is what we call the law. >> the p
while the united states sought his return to face espionage charges for revealing nsa spy programs. in a statement released by wikileaks, edward snowden said -- a russian lawyer for snowden said he is set to begin a new life in russia. we will have more on snowden and the latest nsa leaks after headlines with two members of congress were trying to defined the nsa's all collection of phone and data records -- democrat john conyers of michigan and kentucky republican thomas massie. says iraq hasions closed out its deadliest month in more than five years following a wave of sectarian bombings and shootings. in total, the violence killed 1057 iraqis and injured more than 2300 in july. many of the attacks focused on iraq's shiite majority which leads the government. in egypt, supporters of former president mohammed morsi are .aunching new protests today the interimedge by government to gradually clear out morsi supporters who have been occupying cairo squares, protesters said thursday they will remain in place. we will not evacuate the square until mohamed morsi is returned to power and
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 2,025 (some duplicates have been removed)